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Feature Issue on the ADA and People with Intellectual, Developmental, and Other Disabilities

Published by the Institute on Community Integration (UCEDD) and the Research and Training Center on Community Living, College of Education and Human Development, University of Minnesota • Volume 28 • Number 1 • Winter 2015

From the Editors

In July 2015, we mark the 25th anniversary of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). In talking with people about the difference this law has made in their lives, the lives of their loved ones, and our nation, one of the words we’ve heard most frequently is “promise.” The ADA is, for many, a promise our nation has made that Americans with disabilities will have the same opportunity as Americans without disabilities to experience freedom, dignity, meaning, and inclusion. It’s a promise that the full force of our system of government will be their ally and advocate as they seek to take a valued place in their communities. And it’s a promise that the law will go ahead of them and alongside them dismantling barriers to their full participation in their communities. Many of the people whose articles are in this Impact have found that the promise has changed their lives for the better.

But we’ve also heard authors in this issue talk about ways in which the promise, or the realization of the promise, is incomplete because it doesn’t yet include everyone. Specifically, we’ve heard about ways in which people with intellectual and developmental disabilities have often not reaped the full benefit of the ADA because the challenges and barriers they face are not yet fully addressed. From that perspective, the ADA has not done (and may not by itself be able to do) all that still needs to be done.

So in this Impact, the ADA’s promise is seen as both having arrived, and still on the way. By sharing those different perspectives, we hope readers of this issue will both pause to celebrate the anniversary of this turning point in our nation’s journey, and then continue traveling toward that horizon of full inclusion we have yet to reach.

 

What's Inside

Articles

The ADA: Giving Everyone a Chance to Be Part of the Community

The Promise Claimed: The ADA Has Improved Our Children’s Lives...and There’s More to Do

“We Were Fighters”: An Interview with Connie Martinez

Why the Americans with Disabilities Act is Important to Me

Promises Kept, Promises Broken, Promises Deferred: The Americans with Disabilities Act

Twenty-five Years After ADA Passage: What Story Does the Data Tell?

A Personal and Professional ADA Journey

The Role of the U.S. Department of Justice in Enforcing the ADA’s Integration Mandate

The ADA Has Made a Difference for Me

Resources on the Americans with Disabilities Act

How ADA Litigation Has Supported the Rights of People with Intellectual/Developmental Disabilities

The Olmstead Decision and Its Aftermath

Lois Curtis on Life After Olmstead

Why We Still Need the ADA

Partners in Implementing the ADA: Reflections from Three Iowa Policymakers

What I’ve Learned From the ADA

The ADA Has Given Me Access

Advocating for Everyone’s Family

More Resources Related to the Americans with Disabilities Act and to the Olmstead Decision

The ADA, Section 504 and Postsecondary Education: Information for Students and Their Families

The ADA: Barriers, Needs and the Bigger Picture

What Accessibility Means in its Fullness [sidebar]

Where Do We Go Next? The ADA Moving Forward

 

Publication Information

Managing Editor: Vicki Gaylord

Issue Editors:

Colleen Wieck, Minnesota Governor's Council on Developmental Disabilities

Matt Nalker, The Arc of Mississippi

Amy Hewitt, Research and Training Center on Community Living, Institute on Community Integration, University of Minnesota

Cliff Poetz, Research and Training Center on Community Living, Institute on Community Integration, University of Minnesota

Impact is published by the Institute on Community Integration (UCEDD), and the Research and Training Center on Community Living (RTC), College of Education and Human Development, University of Minnesota. This issue was supported, in part, by Grant #90DD0001 from the Administration on Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities (AIDD), US Department of Health and Human Services to the Institute; and Grant #H133B130006 from the National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research (NIDRR), US Department of Education, to the RTC.

The views expressed are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the views of the Institute, Center or University. The content does not necessarily represent the policy of the US Department of Education or the US Department of Health and Human Services, and endorsement by the Federal Government should not be assumed.

For additional copies or information contact:

Institute on Community Integration
University of Minnesota
109 Pattee Hall
150 Pillsbury Drive SE
Minneapolis, MN 55455
612/624-4512
icipub@umn.edu
http://ici.umn.edu

Impact is available in alternative formats upon request. The University of Minnesota is an equal opportunity employer and educator.

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Retrieved from the Web site of the Institute on Community Integration, University of Minnesota (http://ici.umn.edu/products/impact/281). Citation: Gaylord, V., Wieck, C., Nalker, M., Hewitt, A., & Poetz, C. (Eds). (Winter 2015). Impact: Feature Issue on the ADA and People with Intellectual, Developmental, and Other Disabilities, 28(1). [Minneapolis: University of Minnesota, Institute on Community Integration].

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The University of Minnesota is an equal opportunity employer and educator.