FSRTC Research Brief 2: Caregiver Differences Across Race and Ethnicity [New]

Brief description

This brief examines caregivers’ self-reported mental, physical, or financial strain. The researchers analyzed data from the 2015 Caregiving in the U.S. survey. The purpose of this brief was to look at self-reported caregiver outcome differences across race and ethnicity. Researchers found that caregivers were most likely to be caring for children, parents or siblings. White caregivers were more likely to be older than 50 than were other caregivers. Latino caregivers were the youngest of the caregiver groups. White caregivers were more likely to be caring for a spouse, while Latino caregivers were more likely to be caring for some other family member (such as a grandparent). Caregivers across all groups were more likely to provide supports for instrumental activities of daily living such as helping with finances or shopping than activities of daily living such as helping with hygiene. Most caregivers lived apart from the person they supported and provided supports fewer than 20 hours per week. Caregivers across all races and ethnicities reported similar levels of physical and financial strain related to caregiving. White caregivers reported somewhat more emotional strain than did other caregiver groups.

Brief details