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Feature Issue on Supporting the Social Well-Being of Children and Youth with Disabilities

Published by the Institute on Community Integration (UCEDD) and the Research and Training Center on Community Living, College of Education and Human Development, University of Minnesota • Volume 24 • Number 1 • Spring/Summer 2011

From the Editors

Social well-being is essential to overall health and quality of life for all children, youth, and adults. However, children and youth with disabilities are often at higher risk for experiencing lower levels of social, and related emotional, well-being than their peers without disabilities. They are among those more likely to be bullied and harassed, have a small number of friends, participate in few extracurricular activities, and generally be connected to few people outside their families. This means that the adults in their lives need to be proactive in supporting and strengthening the social well-being of these young people.

This Impact issue brings together a collection of practical and insightful articles related to supporting the social well-being of children and youth with intellectual, developmental and other disabilities in the settings where they live their lives: schools, youth programs, neighborhoods, communities, homes. Its primary focus is on what adults can do to create and sustain environments that contribute to social well-being, rather than social harm, for these young people as well as their peers without disabilities. It includes personal stories of young people, their families and friends; practical strategies for school and community settings; research summaries and profiles of successful programs; and resources for use by educators, families, youth leaders, and others who desire to support the social growth and well-being of all our young people.

What's Inside

Articles

A Dream Come True

Social and Emotional Well-Being of Children and Youth with Disabilities: A Brief Overview

MyaGrace is Going to Dance: A Third Grader's Journey in Social Growth

Advocating for Children's Social-Emotional Well-Being in Educational Settings: Tips for Families (sidebar)

Where Does Social-Emotional Well-Being Fit into the School Curriculum?

Five Ways Adults Can Support the Social Success of Students with Social Learning Challenges

To Serve and Protect: A Dad's Reflections

Supporting Friendship Development For Students with Low-Incidence Disabilities

Creating Social Capital: One Family's Experience

Social Inclusion Resources

Social-Emotional Well-Being of Students with Disabilities: The Importance of Student Support Staff

Therapeutic Recreation in Schools: Supporting Children's Social and Emotional Well-Being

"Mom and Dad… I Sure Could Use More of This!"

Making Friends: Thoughts From Young Adults with Disabilities

Bullying Among Children and Youth with Disabilities and Special Needs

Additional Bullying Prevention Resources (sidebar)

Student Social-Emotional Well-Being: The Role of Administrators and State Education Agencies

Inclusive Classrooms: Achieving Success for All Students

School-Wide Positive Behavioral Support: Promoting Social-Emotional Well-Being of All

Preparing for Adult Life: Important Social Skills for High School Students

Finding a Sense of Belonging Through Disability Culture and Pride

Disability Pride, Culture, and History Resources for Youth (sidebar)

Using Recreation to Support the Social Well-Being of Children and Youth

Structuring Recreation and Youth Programs to Facilitate Social Inclusion

Social Networking Sites: Consider the Benefits, Concerns for Your Teenager

Social Networking Sites and Youth with Disabilities: Resources (sidebar)

Institute Resources Supporting Social Well-Being

 

Publication Information

Managing Editor: Vicki Gaylord

Issue Editors:

Susan Palmer, Beach Center on Disability, University of Kansas, Lawrence

Linda Heyne, Department of Recreation and Leisure Studies, Ithaca College, Ithaca, New York

Jo Montie, Doors to Useful Learning, Minneapolis

Brian Abery, Institute on Community Integration, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis

Impact is published by the Institute on Community Integration (UCEDD), and the Research and Training Center on Community Living and Employment (RTC), College of Education and Human Development, University of Minnesota. This issue was supported, in part, by Grant #90DD0654 from the Administration on Developmental Disabilities (ADD), US Department of Health and Human Services to the Institute; and Grant #H133B080005 from the National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research (NIDRR), US Department of Education, to the RTC.

The views expressed are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the views of the Institute, Center or University. The content does not necessarily represent the policy of the US Department of Education or the US Department of Health and Human Services, and endorsement by the Federal Government should not be assumed.

For additional copies or information contact:

Institute on Community Integration
University of Minnesota
109 Pattee Hall
150 Pillsbury Drive SE
Minneapolis, MN 55455
612/624-4512
icipub@umn.edu
http://ici.umn.edu

Impact is available in alternative formats upon request. The University of Minnesota is an equal opportunity employer and educator.

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Retrieved from the Web site of the Institute on Community Integration, University of Minnesota (http://ici.umn.edu/products/impact/241). Citation: Palmer, S., Heyne, L., Montie, J., Abery, B., & Gaylord, V. (Eds.). (Spring/Summer 2011). Impact: Feature Issue on Supporting the Social Well-Being of Children and Youth with Disabilities, 24(1). [Minneapolis: University of Minnesota, Institute on Community Integration].

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Hard copies of Impact are available from the Publications Office of the Institute on Community Integration. The first copy of this issue is free; additional copies are $4 each. You can request copies by phone at 612/624-4512 or e-mail at icipub@umn.edu, or you can fax or mail us an order form. See our listing of other issues of Impact for more information.

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The University of Minnesota is an equal opportunity employer and educator.