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IMPACT

Advocating for Children's Social-Emotional Well-Being in Educational Settings: Tips for Families

Any child who is not doing well in the social-emotional area of their life will be less likely to do well in their academic performance and overall participation in the school environment. Especially for those who experience barriers to social inclusion at school – which includes many students with disabilities – attention to social-emotional well-being is an important part of supporting success in school and beyond. There are many ways that a family can advocate for the social-emotional well-being of a child with disabilities within educational settings. Below are a few:

Contributed by Susan B. Palmer, Research Professor at the Beach Center on Disability, University of Kansas, Lawrence. She may be reached at spalmer@ku.edu or 785/864-0270.

 

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Retrieved from the Web site of the Institute on Community Integration, University of Minnesota (http://ici.umn.edu/products/impact/241). Citation: Palmer, S., Heyne, L., Montie, J., Abery, B., & Gaylord, V. (Eds.). (Spring/Summer 2011). Impact: Feature Issue on Supporting the Social Well-Being of Children and Youth with Disabilities, 24(1). [Minneapolis: University of Minnesota, Institute on Community Integration].
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The PDF version of this Impact, with photos and graphics, is also online at http://ici.umn.edu/products/impact/241/241.pdf.

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